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Join us April 22nd from 4 – 5:30 pm EST for “Viral Justice: Racism, Vulnerability, and Refuting Black Pathology” a talk by author and speaker Dr. Ruha Benjamin. In this talk, Dr. Benjamin examines the twin crises of COVID-19 and police violence, mapping the many vectors through which racism gets under the skin, into the blood stream, attacking our bodies and body politic. She offers a theory of change, viral justice – as a practical and principled approach to transmuting a hostile racial climate into one that is more habitable, hopeful, and just.

Dr. Benjamin is a world-renowned scholar and professor of African American studies at Princeton University and the director of the Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab. She writes, teaches, and speaks widely on the relationship between innovation and inequity; knowledge and power; and race and citizenship. She is the author of People’s Science: Bodies & Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (Stanford University Press, 2013) and Race After Technology (Polity Press, 2019) and the editor of the award-winning Captivating Technology: Race, Carceral Technoscience, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life (Duke University Press, 2019). Her next book, Viral Justice: How We Grow the World We Want will explore policing and incarceration; healthcare and scientific research; and work and education.

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Please go to http://tinyurl.com/pvjgl7eq to register or use the QR code on the flyer.

Please direct any questions or access needs to Dr. Jennifer Sarrett at jsarret@emory.edu.

This event is hosted by Emory’s Center for the Study of Human Health and co-sponsored by The Hightower Fund as well as the following Emory departments and entities: Laney Graduate School; The Provost’s Office; School of Medicine; Office of Equity and Inclusion; Center for the Study of Human Health; Campus Life; African American Studies; Sociology; School of Nursing; Center for Ethics; ILA; Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture; James Weldon Johnson Institute; WGSS; Anthropology